Category : Ode to Duty Wordsworth Part Two

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The poem takes an autobiographical tone and Wordsworth becomes confessional. He admits that he was inexperienced and was unaware of the perils of trusting his own impulses blindly. Of course, he was not swept away by the winds of passion, yet he opted out to be his own guide committing his faith blindly on his own natural impulses. He has been leading a life of self-indulgence. He had often heard the call of Duty in his heart but on all those occasions, he deferred the carrying out of her summons. He had to turn his back on his life of self-indulgence to listen to the voice of Duty and he did not like to turn away. However, from now on Wordsworth will be different and he will serve Duty rigorously and subjugate himself to her stringent discipline.
Wordsworth humbly implores Duty to subject him to her exacting discipline and to wield her absolute control over him. And then, Wordsworth brings out the reason for his subjugation to the power of Duty. It is not any disturbance or conflict in the mind that makes him seek the guidance of Duty.
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