ICSE 2019 English 2 Model Paper

  ICSE English
            <![CDATA[<h2 style="text-align: center;"><span style="color: #003366;">ICSE 2019 English 2 Model Paper</span></h2>

LITERATURE IN ENGLISH

 ENGLISH Paper – 2

(Two hours)

Answers to this Paper must be written on the paper provided separately.

You will not be allowed to write during the first 15 minutes.

This time is to be spent in reading the question paper.

The time given at the head of this paper is the time allowed for writing the answers.


Attempt five questions in all.

 You must attempt at least one question from each of the Sections A, B and C and not more than two other questions from the same books you have already compulsorily chosen.

The intended marks for questions or parts of questions are given in brackets [].


SECTION A – DRAMA

The Merchant of Venice: Shakespeare

Question 1.
Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

ANTONIO :

Content, i’ faith: I’ll seal to such a bond
And say there is much kindness in the Jew.

BASSANIO

You shall not seal to such a bond for me:
I’ll rather dwell in my necessity.

ANTONIO

Why, fear not, man; I will not forfeit it:
Within these two months, that’s a month before
This bond expires, I do expect return
Of thrice three times the value of this bond.

Question 1.

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

ANTONIO :

Content, i’ faith: I’ll seal to such a bond
And say there is much kindness in the Jew.

BASSANIO

You shall not seal to such a bond for me:
I’ll rather dwell in my necessity.

ANTONIO

Why, fear not, man; I will not forfeit it:
Within these two months, that’s a month before
This bond expires, I do expect return
Of thrice three times the value of this bond.

  1. Where does the scene take place? Who all are present there? Why?                         [3]
  2. What is the bond referred to here? What are the conditions  in the bond? Why does Antonio say there is kindness in the Jew?      [3]
  3. Why is Bassanio against Antonio signing such a bond?                                     [3]
    Explain: I’ll rather dwell in my necessity.
  4. Why is Antonio confident that he will not forfeit the bond?                          [3]
  5. Antonio is eager to sign the bond while Bassanio objects to it. Whom do you think wiser here: Antonio or Bassanio? Whose fears proved true later in the play? How?     [4]

Question 2.
Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:
PORTIA
I pray you, tarry: pause a day or two
Before you hazard; for, in choosing wrong,
I lose your company: therefore forbear awhile.
There’s something tells me, but it is not love,
I would not lose you; and you know yourself,
Hate counsels not in such a quality.
But lest you should not understand me well,–
And yet a maiden hath no tongue but thought,–
I would detain you here some month or two
Before you venture for me. I could teach you
How to choose right, but I am then forsworn;
So will I never be: so may you miss me;
But if you do, you’ll make me wish a sin,
That I had been forsworn. Beshrew your eyes,
They have o’erlook’d me and divided me;
One half of me is yours, the other half yours,
Mine own, I would say; but if mine, then yours,
And so all yours. O, these naughty times
Put bars between the owners and their rights!
And so, though yours, not yours. Prove it so,
Let fortune go to hell for it, not I.
I speak too long; but ’tis to peize the time,
To eke it and to draw it out in length,
To stay you from election.
(i) Where does this scene take place?
Why does Portia say I pray you, tarry: pause a day or two/ Before you hazard. ? [3]
(ii) How does Portia justify her lengthy speech here? What do you understand about her feelings towards Bassanio from this speech? [3]
(iii) What prevents Portia from instructing Bassanio how to choose the correct casket?
If Bassanio were to make a wrong choice what would Portia have wished? [3]
(iv) Explain:
Beshrew your eyes, They have o’erlook’d me and divided me; [3]
(v) What do you infer about Portia, the lover and Portia, the daughter, from her speech ? [4]
Question 3.
Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:
SHYLOCK
A Daniel come to judgment! yea, a Daniel!
O wise young judge, how I do honour thee!
(i) Why does Shylock call Portia a worthy judge? Why was she compared to Daniel earlier? [3]
(ii) Earlier Portia speaks about mercy to Shylock.
She says that “It becomes /the throned monarch better than his crown” and “mercy is above this sceptre sway.” What does she want to convey here by saying so? [3]
(iii) Why does Portia say, ‘We do pray for mercy’? What does this show us about mercy? [3]
(iv) How does Shylock respond to Portia’s plea for mercy? [3]
(v) Why does Gratiano rejoice later by repeating the words, ‘O learned judge” ? [4]

SECTION B – POETRY
Answer one or more questions from this Section.
A Collection of Poems

Question 4.
Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:
Some are purple and gold flecked grey
For she who has journeyed through life midway
Whose hands have cherished, whose love has blest,
And cradled fair sons on her faithful breast.
And serves her household in fruitful pride.
And worships the gods at her husband’s side.
(The Bangle Seller, Sarojini Naidu)

(i) How is a middle – aged woman described here? [3]
(ii) Explain the expressions ‘shining loads’, ‘delicate, bright rainbow-tinted circles of light’
and ‘lustrous tokens of radiant lives’ used in the poem. [3]
(iii) Bring out the contrast between the images of ‘bridal laughter’ and ‘bridal tear’. [3]
(iv) For which kind of women are the bangles described in these lines, apt for? Why? [3]
(v) Comment on the changes in the life of a woman vis-à-vis the colour of her bangles. [4]
Question 5.
Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:
For oft, when on my couch I lie
In vacant or in pensive mood,
They flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.
( Daffodils, William Wordsworth)
(i) In the poem, who wandered like a lonely cloud and where ? Who does he come across while wandering ? [3]
(ii) What do you understand when the poet says, “Ten thousand saw I at a glance,/ Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.”? [3]
(iii) Explain the line What wealth the show to me had brought just before this stanza. [3]
(iv) What occurs to the poet when he is occasionally in a pensive mood? What is the bliss of solitude referred to here? [3]
(v) What aspect of the poem appealed to you the most? Why? [4]
Question 6.
Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:
Thus, I entered, and thus I go!
In triumphs, people have dropped down dead.
“Paid by the world, what dost thou owe
Me?”—God might question; now instead,
’Tis God shall repay: I am safer so.
(The Patriot, Robert Browning)
(i) Bring out the significance of the first line of the extract. [3]
(ii) Describe the situation when the speaker is marched through the streets to the gallows. [3]
(iii) Describe how the townspeople received the speaker a year before. [3]
(iv) What solace does the speaker have now? Why? [3]
(v) Comment on the theme of the poem. [4]

SECTION C – PROSE
Answer one or more questions from only ONE of the following books that you have studied:
A Collection of Short Stories
or
Animal Farm
or
The Call of the Wild
A Collection of Short Stories

Question 7.
Answer the following questions with reference to Ernest Hemingway’s short story entitled ‘Old Man at the Bridge’.
“If you are rested I would go,” I urged. “Get up and try to walk now.”
“Thank you,” he said and got to his feet, swayed from side to side and then sat down backwards in the dust.
“I was taking care of animals,” he said dully, but no longer to me. “I was only taking care of animals.”
There was nothing to do about him. It was Easter Sunday and the Fascists were advancing toward the Ebro. It was a grey overcast day with a low ceiling so their planes were not up. That and the fact that cats know how to look after themselves was all the good luck that the old man would ever have.
(i) Why does the narrator notice that the old man spoke ‘dully’? What makes the narrator feel that “ there was nothing to do about him?” [3]
(ii) Explain how the story brings out the conflict between man and his inner self. [3]
(iii) The old man seems to have given up on his life. Do you agree? Why ? [3]
(iv) What is “all the good luck that old man would ever have?” [3]
(v) What is the irony in setting the story on an Easter Sunday ? [4]
Question 8.
Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:
She again rubbed a match on the wall, and the light shone round her; in the brightness stood her old grandmother, clear and shining, yet mild and loving in her appearance.
“Grandmother,” cried the little one, “O take me with you; I know you will go away when the match burns out; you will vanish like the warm stove, the roast goose, and the large, glorious Christmas-tree.” And she made haste to light the whole bundle of matches, for she wished to keep her grandmother there. And the matches glowed with a light that was brighter than the noon-day, and her grandmother had never appeared so large or so beautiful. She took the little girl in her arms, and they both flew upwards in brightness and joy far above the earth, where there was neither cold nor hunger nor pain, for they were with God.
(i) Which day of the year was it in the story? Describe the condition of the girl. What did the girl carry in her pocket? [3]
(ii) What happened when she lighted another match? [3]
(iii) Why did the girl make haste to light the whole bundle of matches? [3]
(iv) What happened to the little girl? What did the people think? Why was there a smile on the girl’s lips? Did the people understand? [3]
(v) The story The Little Match Girl can be viewed as a work of opposites. Justify. [4]
Question 9.
Answer the following questions with reference to Jesse Owens’ short story ‘My Greatest Olympic Prize’.
You can melt down all the gold medals and cups I have, and they couldn’t be a plating on the 24-carat friendship I felt for Luz Long at that moment. I realized then, too, that Luz was the epitome of what Pierre de Coubertin, founder of the modern Olympic Games, must have had in mind when he said, “The important thing in the Olympic Games is not winning but taking part. The essential thing in life is not conquering but fighting well.”
(i) Narrate how Jesse Owens sheds light upon his expectations and fears before his win. [3]
(ii) How did Luz Long help Jesse Owens? How did the rivalry of Owens and Long end? [3]
(iii) What, according to Coubertin, is the true spirit of the Olympics? [3]
(iv) How did Luz Long typify the true sporting spirit? [3]
(v) Which is considered as the greatest Olympic prize? Why? [4]

[user_registration_form id=”748″]

]]>

Share This

Advertisements